Southwest attendant suffers broken back in hard landing

A Southwest Airlines airline steward experienced a pressure break to a vertebra in her upper back during a hard landing last month in California, according to government wellbeing investigators. To know everything in detail regarding Southwest attendant suffers broken back in hard landing read the full article.

The National Transportation Safety Board said the effect of landing was hard to such an extent that the airline steward thought the plane had crashed. She felt pain in her back and neck and couldn’t move, and was taken to an emergency clinic where she was determined to have a crack.

Southwest attendant suffers broken back in hard landing
Southwest attendant suffers broken back in hard landing

The security board finished its investigation without saying what caused the hard landing. The NTSB expressed none of the other 141 individuals on board the plane were injured in the incident at John Wayne Airport in Santa Ana, California. The pilots let investigators know that they were aiming for the typical score zone on the generally short runway. Southwest attendant suffers broken back in hard landing. We revealed the make a difference to the NTSB in understanding with administrative necessities and led an internal survey of the occasion.”

 

Southwest attendant suffers broken back in hard landing

 

A representative for the airline declined to give additional information when gotten some information about the consequence of the internal investigation and whether the plane was inspected for proof of harm that could happen during a hard landing. The plane has been making a few flights per day, according to tracking administrations.

Soon after the 18-year-old Boeing 737-700 maneuvered off the runway, the pilots — a 55-year-old captain and 49-year-old co-pilot — were told about the injury to the airline steward, who was in a leap seat at the back of the plane. Southwest attendant suffers broken back in hard landing.

The NTSB, which didn’t venture out to the mishap site, has not made its reports from the investigation openly accessible. The runway that the plane arrived on is just 5,700 feet in length (1,700 meters). By examination, runways at neighboring Los Angeles International Airport range between 8,900 and almost 13,000 feet (2,700 to 3,900 meters). The NTSB investigation was accounted for before by The Dallas Morning News.